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PORTRAIT OF FAUSTO VERANZIO, (FAUSTUS VERANTIUS, FAUSTUS VERANCSICS, FAUSTO VRANCIC) (ŠIBENIK (SIBENICO) CIRCA 1551 – VENICE, JANUARY 17, 1617) ITALIANO: SCANSIONE PERSONALE DA LIBRO UNGHERESE DEL 1920 - FAUST VRANČIĆ FAUSTO VERANZIO  BORN 	ŠIBENIK, REPUBLIC OF VENICE (TODAY IN CROATIA) NATIONALITY 	CROATIAN[1] FIELD 	POLYMATH AND BISHOP WORKS 	MACHINAE NOVAE, DICTIONARIUM QUINQUE NOBILISSIMARUM EUROPÆ LINGUARUM

 

Faust Vrančić

Fausto Veranzio


Born     Šibenik, Republic of Venice
(today in Croatia)

 

Nationality     Croatian[1]

Field     Polymath and bishop

Works     Machinae Novae, Dictionarium quinque nobilissimarum Europæ linguarum

 

Fausto Veranzio[2] or Faust Vrančić[3] (Latin: Faustus Verantius; Hungarian and Vernacular Latin: Verancsics Faustus)[4][5] (circa 1551 – January 17, 1617) was a polymath and bishop from Croatia.[6]

Contents

Life

ANTUN VRANCIC - LATE 16TH CENTURY - FAUSTO'S UNCLE ANTUN VRANČIĆ - AUTHOR: MARTIN ROTA KOLUNIC (MARTINUS ROTA) C. 1540-1583

Fausto's uncle Antun Vrančić - Author: Martin Rota Kolunic (Martinus Rota) c. 1540-1583

Family history

Fausto was born in Šibenik (then Sebenico, a part of the Venetian Republic)[7] in the Croatian[1] noble family of counts Veranzio or conti Verantii (a branch of which later merged with Draganich family, creating the Counts Draganich-Veranzio),[8] a notable family of writers.
He was the son of Michele Veranzio, a Latin poet, and the nephew of Antonio (Croatian: Antun Vrančić),[8] archbishop of Esztergom (1504–1573), a diplomat and a civil servant, who was in touch with Erasmus (1465–1536), Philipp Melanchthon (1497–1560), and Nikola Šubić Zrinski (1508–1566), who took Fausto with him during some of his travels trough Hungary and the Republic of Venice.[9]
Fausto's mother was from the Berislavić family. His brother, Giovanni, died still young in battle.[8]

The Veranzio family probably came from Bosnia to the town of Šibenik[7] (Dalmatia), where a member of the family was mentioned for the first time in 1360.[10]
While the family's main residence was in city of Šibenik, they owned a big summer house on island Prvić, in place Šepurine, a neighboring place to Prvić Luka (where he is buried in local church). The baroque castle that was used by Vrančić family as summer residence is now in possession of family Draganić.

Education and political activities

As a youth, Veranzio was interested in science. Still a child, he moved to Venice, where he attended schools, and then to Padua to join the University, where he focused on law, physics, engineering and mechanics.
At the court of King Rudolf II, in Hradcany Castle, in Prague, Veranzio was chancellor for Hungary and Transylvania often in contact with Johannes Kepler and Tycho Brahe.
After his wife's death,[11] Veranzio left for Hungary. In 1598, he got the title of Episcŏpus Csanadiensis[12] in partibus (even if he never set foot in Csanád). In 1609, back in Venice, he joined the brotherhood of Saint Paul of Tarsus (barnabites) and committed himself to the study of science. Veranzio died in 1617 in Venice and was buried in Croatia, near his family's countryhouse on the island of Prvić in the Adriatic Sea.

Polymath and inventor

Veranzio's masterwork, Machinae Novae (Venice 1595), contained 49 large pictures depicting 56 different machines, devices, and technical concepts.
Two variants of this work exist, one with the "Declaratio" in Latin and Italian, the other with the addition of three other languages. Only a few copies survived and often do not present a complete text in all the five languages. This book was written in Italian, Spanish, French and German.[13] The tables represent a varied set of projects, inventions and creations of the author. There Veranzio wrote about water and solar energy, the universal clock (Plates 6–7), several types of mills, agricultural machinery, various types of bridge in various materials, machinery for clearing the sea, a dual sedan traveling on mule (Plate 47), special coaches, and Homo Volans (Plate 38) a forerunner of the parachute. His work included a portable boat (Plate 39), that is say a boat that, thanks to the same energy as the current may go against the river (Plate 40). It was his idea to use the printing rotary principle (e.g. grinding them printers, Plate 46) in order to alleviate the great difficulty of printers and improve results.
Despite the extraordinary rarity of this book (because the author published it at his own expense, without a publisher and having to stop printing because of lack of funds),[13] the Machinae Novae was the work which mainly contributed to Veranzio's popularity around the world. His design pictures were even reprinted a few years later and published in China.[14]

Veranzio's parachute

One of the illustrations in Machinae Novae is a sketch of a parachute dubbed Homo Volans ("The Flying Man"). Having examined Leonardo da Vinci's rough sketches of a parachute, Veranzio designed a parachute of his own.[15][16] Paolo Guidotti (about 1590) already attempted to carry out Da Vinci's theories, ending by falling on a house roof and breaking his thigh bone; but while Francis Godwin was writing his flying romance The Man in the Moone", Fausto Veranzio performed a parachute jumping experiment for real.[17]
He is considered the first man to build and test a parachute: in 1617, now over sixty-five years old, he implemented his design and tested the parachute by jumping from St Mark's Campanile in Venice.[18] This event was documented some 30 years after it happened in a book[19] written by John Wilkins, the secretary of the Royal Society in London.

Mills

His areas of interest in engineering and mechanics were broad. Mills were one of his main point of research, where he created 18 different designs. He envisioned windmills with both vertical and horizontal axes, with different wing constructions to improve their efficiency. The idea of a mill powered by tides incorporated accumulation pools filled with water by the high tide and emptied when the tide ebbed, simply using gravity; the concept has just recently been engineered and used.

Urbanist and engineer in Rome and Venice

By order of the Pope, he spent two years in Rome where he envisioned and made projects needed for regulating rivers, since Rome was often flooded by the Tiber river.[20] He also tackled the problem of the wells and water supply of Venice, which is surrounded by sea.[20] Devices to register the time using water, fire, or other methods were envisioned and materialized. His own sun clock was effective in reading the time, date, and month, but functioned only in the middle of the day.
The construction method of building metal bridges and the mechanics of the forces in the area of statics were also part of his research. He drew proposals which predated the actual construction of modern suspension bridges and cable-stayed bridges by over two centuries. The last area was described when further developed in a separate book by mathematician Simon de Bruges (Simon Stevin) in 1586.

FAUSTO VERANZIO HOMO VOLANS - MACHINAE NOVAE PLATE N. 38: VERANZIO'S PARACHUTE - FROM MACHINAE NOVAE, BOOK PUBLISHED IN VENICE, 1595.- AUTHOR FAUSTO VERANZIO

Fausto Veranzio homo volans - "Machinae Novae" plate n. 38: Veranzio's parachute - from Machinae Novae, book published in Venice, 1595.- Author Fausto Veranzio

 

DRAWING OF SUSPENSION CABLE-STAYED BRIDGE BY FAUSTO VERANZIO IN HIS MACHINAE NOVAE - ITALIANO: INCISIONE DEL "PONS FERREUS". PROGETTO DI   PONTE STRALLATO SI FAUSTO VERANZIO ENGLISH: PICTURE OF "PONS FERREUS". SUSPENDED BRIDGE. DESIGN BY FAUSTO VERANZIO, MACHINAE NOVAE VENICE, 1616
Pons ferreus- Drawing of suspension cable-stayed bridge by Fausto Veranzio in his Machinae Novae - Italiano: incisione del "pons ferreus". Progetto di ponte strallato si Fausto Veranzio English: picture of "pons ferreus". Suspended bridge. Design by Fausto Veranzio, Machinae Novae Venice, 1616

 

PENTADICTIONARIUM - FRONTESPIECE OF THE DICTIONARIUM QUINQUE LINGARUM - FAUSTO VERANZIO'S DICTIONARIUM QUINQUE NOBILISSIMARUM EUROPÆ LINGUARUM, LATINÆ,   ITALICÆ, GERMANICÆ, DALMATIÆ, & VULGARICÆ, APUD NICOLAUM MORETTUM, 1595, VENICE

Pentadictionarium - Frontespiece of the Dictionarium quinque lingarum - Fausto Veranzio's "Dictionarium quinque nobilissimarum Europæ linguarum, Latinæ, Italicæ, Germanicæ, Dalmatiæ, & Vulgaricæ", Apud Nicolaum Morettum, 1595, Venice

VERANZIO'S PARACHUTE IN ŠIBENIK'S WELLS MUSEUM -  WELLS MUSEUM IN ŠIBENIK, FAUST VRANČIĆ

Veranzio's parachute in Šibenik's Wells Museum - Wells museum in Šibenik, Faust Vrančić

Lexicography

FAUSTO VERANZIO - FAUST VRANČIĆ - SCHIFFSTAUEREI NACH VERANZIO UM 1595

Veranzio was the author of a five-language dictionary,[21] Dictionarium quinque nobilissimarum Europæ linguarum, Latinæ, Italicæ, Germanicæ, Dalmatiæ, & Vngaricæ,[22] published in Venice in 1595, with 5,000 entries for each language: Latin, Italian, German, the Dalmatian language (in particular, the Chakavian dialect of Croatian) and Hungarian. These he called the "five noblest European languages" ("quinque nobilissimarum Europæ linguarum").[23]
The Dictionarium is a very early and significant example of both Croatian and Hungarian lexicography, and contains, in addition to the parallel list of vocabulary, other documentation of these two languages. In particular, Veranzio listed in the Dictionarium 304 Hungarian words that he deemed to be borrowed from Croatian. Also, at the end of the book, Veranzio included Croatian language versions of the Ten Commandments, the Lord's Prayer, the Ave Maria and the Apostles' Creed.[24]

In an extension of the dictionary called Vocabula dalmatica quae Ungri sibi usurparunt, there is a list of Proto-Croatian words that entered the Hungarian language. The book greatly influenced the formation of both the Croatian and Hungarian orthography; the Hungarian language accepted his suggestions, for example, the usage of ly, ny, sz, and cz. It was also the first dictionary of the Hungarian language, printed four times, in Venice, Prague (1606), Pozun (1834) [25], and in Zagreb, Yugoslavia, in 1971. The work was an important source of inspiration for other European dictionaries such as an Hungarian and Italian dictionary written by Bernardino Balli, a German Thesaurus polyglottus by humanist and lexicographer Hieronim Megister, and multilingual Dictionarium septem diversarum linguarum by Peterus Lodereckerus of Prague in 1605.[23]

FAUSTO VERANZIO

History and philosophy

Only a few of Veranzio's works related to history remain: Regulae cancellariae regni Hungariae and De Slavinis seu Sarmatis in Dalmatia exist in manuscript form, while Scriptores rerum hungaricum was published in 1798. In Logica nova ("New logic") and Ethica christiana ("Christian ethics"), which were published in a single Venetian edition in 1616, Veranzio dealt with the problems of theology regarding the ideological clash between the Reformation movement and Catholicism. Tommaso Campanella (1568–1639) and the Archbishop of Split Marco Antonio de Dominis (1560–1624) were his intellectual counterparts.

Lost works

Veranzio published some of his last works under the name "Giusto Verace"[26]. Some of them were never printed, left in the form of manuscripts. Some were sold to stay in big archives in the capitals of Austria or Hungary, while some were lost forever.

Legacy

When Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889–1951), Austrian-British philosopher and mathematician, moving from Berlin to England, began studying mechanical engineering in 1908, he was highly influenced by his reading of Renaissance technical treatises, particularly Veranzio's Machinae Novae.[27]
The 17th century Brooklyn Tidal Mill in Long Island (NY), one of the most popular and few still standing mills in the New York City area,[28] was built after the plan of Fausto Veranzio.[28][29][30]
Today, one of the oldest astronomical societies in Croatia bears the name "Faust Vrančić", as does a Croatian Navy rescue ship, as well as many schools in Croatia.

FAUSTO VERANZIO

Notes

1. ^ a b Library and Waleson, John Crerar and Anthea (1984). Nature disclosed: books from the collections of the John Crerar Library illustrating the history of science. University of Chicago Library. p. 17. ISBN 0943056039, 9780943056036.
2. ^ Alfred Day Rathbone, He's in the paratroops now, R.M. McBride & Company, 1943, University of California. page 172
3. ^ Originally pronounced "vranchich"
4. ^ Andrew L. Simon, Made in Hungary: Hungarian contributions to universal culture
5. ^ The Hungarian Quarterly, Vol. XLII * No. 162 *, Summer 2001 László Sipka: Innovators and Innovations
6. ^ Berthold Laufer, The Prehistory of Aviation Chicago Field Museum of Natural History, University of Michigan, 1928
7. ^ a b Today Šibenik, Croatia. Cfr. A collection of modern and contemporary voyages & travels, Oxford University, 1805
8. ^ a b c Abbe Albert Fortis, Travels Into Dalmatia, 1768
9. ^ Memoirs of the court of Augustus: continued, and completed, from the original papers of the late Sir Thomas Blackwell John Mills, University of Aberdeen, Printed for A. Millar, 1753
10. ^ Naklada Naprijed, The Croatian Adriatic Tourist Guide, pg. 208, Zagreb (1999), ISBN 953-178-097-8
11. ^ Cultural Link Kanada, Deutschland: Festschrift zum Dreissigjährigen Bestehen by Beate Henn-Memmesheimer & David Gethin John
12. ^ bishop of Csanád
13. ^ a b Original Machine Novae, Fausto VERANZIO - Malavasi Library, Milan - a complete and very detailed description of first and second edition of Veranzio's most famous work, "Machine Nove"
14. ^ Weiying Gu, Ku Wei-Ying,Missionary approaches and linguistics in mainland China and Taiwan, Leuven University Press, 2001 - ISBN 9058671615 - Page 184
15. ^ "The Invention of the Parachute", by Lynn White, Jr. in: Technology and Culture, Vol. 9, No. 3. (1968), pp. 462-467 (463)
16. ^ Jonathan Bousfield, The Rough Guide to Croatia, pg. 280, Rough Guides (2003), ISBN 1843530848
17. ^ Francis Trevelyan Miller, The world in the air: the story of flying in pictures, G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1930, pages 101-106
18. ^ He's in the paratroops now, Alfred Day Rathbone, R.M. McBride & Company, 1943, University of California.
19. ^ The book mentioning Veranzio parachute jump is John Wilkins's Mathematical Magic of the Wonders that may be Performed by Mechanical Geometry, Part I: Concerning Mechanical Powers Motion, and Part II, Deadloss or Mechanical Motions (London, 1648)
20. ^ a b Biblioteca italiana, o sia giornale di letteratura, scienze ed arti, Vol 53, New York Public Library, 1829 (Italian)
21. ^ Dictionaries in Early Modern Europe: Lexicography and the Making of Heritage by John P. Considine.
22. ^ Apud Nicolaum Morettum, 1595, Venice
23. ^ a b When Petrus Lodereckerus published in 1606 his Dictionarivm septem diversarvm lingvarvm, videlicet Latine, Italice, Dalmatice, Bohemicè, Polonicè, Germanicè, & Vngaricè, vna cum cuiuslibet linguæ registro siue repertorio vernaculo, Singulari studio & industria collectum a Petro Lodereckeroin (Prague), he included two more languages than Veranzio's pentadictionary: Czech and Polish, with the addition of indices in Latin for each language.
24. ^ Was Faust Vrančić the first Croatian lexicographer?", by Branko Franolić, Annali Istituto Orientale di Napoli, Volume 19, 1976, p.178-182
25. ^ Today Bratislava in Slovakia
26. ^ The pseudonym "Giusto Verace" is a sort of pun in Italian: means "just (righteous) and genuine (truthful)".
27. ^ F. A. Flowers, Portraits of Wittgenstein, Volume 2, page 133
28. ^ a b Roger H. Charlier and Charles W. Finkl,Ocean Energy: Tide and tidal power
29. ^ Bernard L. Gordon, Energy from the sea: marine resource readings, Book & Tackle - University of Virginia, 1977, ISBN 0910258074. - p. 119
30. ^ ISES Congress 2007 Nothing New Under the Sun or Every Little Bit Helps Tidal Power: Status & Perspectives R.H. Charlier, M.C.P. Chaineux, C.W. Finkl, A.C Thys, Vol. I–V, Springer

References

* Great machines Volume 69, Franz Engler, illustrated CIPIA, 1997 (University of Michigan) p. 4-14
* "Bridges and men", Joseph Gies, Doubleday, University of Michigan, 2009
* Aspects of Materials Handling‎ Dr. K.C. Arora, Vikas V. Shinde - Firewall Media, 2007, ISBN 8131802515
* Instruments in art and science: on the architectonics of cultural boundaries Helmar Schramm, Ludger Schwarte, Jan Lazardzig - Literary Criticism, 2008
* Sugar and society in China: peasants, technology, and the world market S. Mazumdar - Harvard University Asia Center, Cambridge Mass. 1998, ISBN 067485408X,
* Engineering in history‎, Richard Shelton Kirby, Technology & Engineering, 1990
* Means and Methods Analysis of a Cast-In-Place Balanced Cantilever Segmental Bridge: Veranzio’s Machinae Novae Gunnar Lucko - Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2000
* American building art: the nineteenth century, Carl W. Condit, OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS - page 163:
* The birth of modern science The making of Europe, P. Rossi, Wiley-Blackwell, 2001 ISBN 9780631227113
* Water architecture in the lands of Syria: the water-wheels
* The Italian Achievement: An A-Z Over 1000 'Firsts' Achieved by Italians in Almost Every Aspect of Life Over the Last 1000 Years A. Baron Renaissance, 2008 University of California ISBN 1898823553391
* History of Technology History of Technology, Graham Hollister-Short. A brief history of the technology through the centuries. The author is Honorary Lecteur of the Imperial College of London
* Charles Joseph Singer, A History of Technology, Charles Singer (British historian of science and medicine)
* Dizionario bibliografico degli uomini illustri della Dalmazia, Šime Ljubić (Italian)
* Archibald Montgomery Low, Parachutes in peace and war, Archibald Low (English consulting engineer, research physicist and inventor, called "the father of the radio guidance systems"), 1942
* Medieval religion and technology: collection of essays (1978), Lynn Townsend, professor of medieval history at Princeton, Stanford and UCLA.
* Anthropological series, (vol. 18), Field Museum of Natural History, Field Columbian Museum.
* Technology and culture, Society for the History of Technology, vol. 9, 1968
* Design paradigms: case histories of error and judgment in engineering Henry Petroski CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 1994 ISBN 9780521466493
* Technological concepts and mathematical models in the evolution of modern engineering systems: controlling, managing, organizing, Mario Lucertini, Ana Millán Gasc, F. Nicolò, Birkhäuser, 2004, ISBN 376436940X
* Histoire des sciences mathématiques en Italie: depuis la renaissance des lettres jusqu'à la fin du dix-septième siècle Ghent University, 1848 (French)
* Musei per la scienza - Science museums L.B.Peressut, Pub. Lybra imagine, (illustrated) 1998, ISBN 8882230333
* Fausto Veranzio - Innovatore (Italian)


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Portrait_of_Fausto_Veranzio - Portrait of Fausto Veranzio, (Faustus Verantius, Faustus Verancsics, Fausto Vrancic) (Šibenik (Sibenico) circa 1551 – Venice, January 17, 1617) Italiano: Scansione personale da libro ungherese del 1920

Antun Vrancic - late 16th century - Fausto's uncle Antun Vrančić - Author: Martin Rota Kolunic (Martinus Rota) c. 1540-1583

Fausto_Veranzio_homo_volans - "Machinae Novae" plate n. 38: Veranzio's parachute - from Machinae Novae, book published in Venice, 1595.- Author Fausto Veranzio

Pons_ferreus_by_Fausto_Veranzio - Drawing of suspension cable-stayed bridge by Fausto Veranzio in his Machinae Novae - Italiano: incisione del "pons ferreus". Progetto di ponte strallato si Fausto Veranzio English: picture of "pons ferreus". Suspended bridge. Design by Fausto Veranzio, Machinae Novae Venice, 1616

Fausto_Veranzio_Pentadictionarium - Frontespiece of the Dictionarium quinque lingarum - Fausto Veranzio's "Dictionarium quinque nobilissimarum Europæ linguarum, Latinæ, Italicæ, Germanicæ, Dalmatiæ, & Vulgaricæ", Apud Nicolaum Morettum, 1595, Venice

Wells_museum_in_sibenik_2 - Veranzio's parachute in Šibenik's Wells Museum - Wells museum in Šibenik, Faust Vrančić

Fausto_Veranzio.jpg

800px-Schiffstauerei_nach_Veranzio_um_1595

Faust Vrančić

 

 

PORTRAIT_OF_FAUSTO_VERANZIO - PORTRAIT OF FAUSTO VERANZIO, (FAUSTUS VERANTIUS, FAUSTUS VERANCSICS, FAUSTO VRANCIC) (ŠIBENIK (SIBENICO) CIRCA 1551 – VENICE, JANUARY 17, 1617) ITALIANO: SCANSIONE PERSONALE DA LIBRO UNGHERESE DEL 1920

ANTUN VRANCIC - LATE 16TH CENTURY - FAUSTO'S UNCLE ANTUN VRANČIĆ - AUTHOR: MARTIN ROTA KOLUNIC (MARTINUS ROTA) C. 1540-1583

FAUSTO_VERANZIO_HOMO_VOLANS - "MACHINAE NOVAE" PLATE N. 38: VERANZIO'S PARACHUTE - FROM MACHINAE NOVAE, BOOK PUBLISHED IN VENICE, 1595.- AUTHOR FAUSTO VERANZIO

PONS_FERREUS_BY_FAUSTO_VERANZIO - DRAWING OF SUSPENSION CABLE-STAYED BRIDGE BY FAUSTO VERANZIO IN HIS MACHINAE NOVAE - ITALIANO: INCISIONE DEL "PONS FERREUS". PROGETTO DI PONTE STRALLATO SI FAUSTO VERANZIO ENGLISH: PICTURE OF "PONS FERREUS". SUSPENDED BRIDGE. DESIGN BY FAUSTO VERANZIO, MACHINAE NOVAE VENICE, 1616

FAUSTO_VERANZIO_PENTADICTIONARIUM - FRONTESPIECE OF THE DICTIONARIUM QUINQUE LINGARUM - FAUSTO VERANZIO'S "DICTIONARIUM QUINQUE NOBILISSIMARUM EUROPÆ LINGUARUM, LATINÆ, ITALICÆ, GERMANICÆ, DALMATIÆ, & VULGARICÆ", APUD NICOLAUM MORETTUM, 1595, VENICE



WELLS_MUSEUM_IN_SIBENIK_2 - VERANZIO'S PARACHUTE IN ŠIBENIK'S WELLS MUSEUM - WELLS MUSEUM IN ŠIBENIK, FAUST VRANČIĆ

Prof. Soljacic is an expert in photonic crystals and nonlinear
optics. He has co-authored more than 60 scientific articles, is a
co-inventor on 12 patents (10 more pending), and has given more than 40
invited talks at conferences and universities around the world. In 2005,
he was awared Adolph Lomb Medal of the Optical Society of America, and in
2006, he was chosen by Technology Review to be one of the "TR35": top 35
innovators under the age of 35.

Partial list of Prof. Soljacic's patents:

"Shock wave modulation and control of electromagnetic radiation [nonlinear
mechanism]" Evan J. Reed, Marin Soljacic, Steven G. Johnson, Maksim
Skorobogatiy, and J.D.Joannopoulos. U.S. patent number 7,079,308, issued
in July 2006.


"Photonic Crystal Waveguides Having Tailored Dispersion Profiles" Torkel
Engeness, Steven Johnson, Mihai Ibanescu, Yoel Fink, Ori Weisberg,
J.D.Joannopolous, Maksim Skorobogatiy, Marin Soljacic, and Steven A.
Jacobs. U.S. patent number 6,895,154, issued in May 2005.


"Mach-Zehnder Interferometer Using Photonic Bandgap Crystals" Marin
Soljacic, Shanhui Fan, Mihai Ibanescu, Steven G. Johnson, and
J.D.Joannopoulos. U.S. patent number 6,917,431, issued in July 2005.


"High Index Contrast Fiber Waveguides and Applications [devices based on
axial modulation and high-Q]" Marin Soljacic, Mihai Ibanescu, Torkel
Engeness, Maksim Skorobogatiy, Steven Johnson, Ori Weisberg, Yoel Fink,
Rokan U. Ahmad, Lori Pressman, Wesley A. King, Emilia Anderson, and
J.D.Joannopoulos. U.S. patent number 6,898,359, issued in May 2005.


"High Index Contrast Fiber Waveguides and Applications [TIR devices]"
Rokan U. Ahmad, Marin Soljacic, Mihai Ibanescu, Torkel Engeness, Maksim
Skorobogatiy, Steven G. Johnson, Ori Weisberg, Yoel Fink, Lori Pressman,
Wesley A. King, Emilia Anderson, and J.D.Joannopoulos. U.S. patent number
6,788,864, issued in September 2004.


"High Index Contrast Fiber Waveguides and Applications[codrawing rules]"
Wesley King, Emilia Anderson, Marin Soljacic, Mihai Ibanescu, Torkel
Engeness, Maksim Skorobogatiy, Steven G. Johnson, Ori Weisberg, Yoel Fink,
Rokan U. Ahmad, and Lori Pressman. U.S. patent number 6,801,698, issued in
October 2004.


"Low-loss photonic crystal waveguide having large core radius
[continuation of U.S. patent 6,625,364]" Steven G. Johnson, Mihai
Ibanescu, Ori Weisberg, Yoel Fink, J.D.Joannopolous, Maksim Skorobogatiy,
Torkel Engeness, Marin Soljacic, and Steven A. Jacobs. U.S. patent number
7,072,553, issued in July 2006.


"Low-loss photonic crystal waveguide having large core radius" Steven G.
Johnson, Mihai Ibanescu, Ori Weisberg, Yoel Fink, J.D.Joannopolous, Maksim
Skorobogatiy, Torkel Engeness, Marin Soljacic, and Steven A. Jacobs. U.S.
patent number 6,625,364, issued in September 2003.
 

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